10 ways to free up space in android devices

Android-System-Access

Hello friends today android is popular os. Most of peoples today use android devices. Android has good GUI so android is easy to using applications, playing games, create documents etc. But the main problem occure when we use android mobile regulerly is internal storage. So today in this post I will tell you simple ways to free up space in android mobile phone or tablets. Given below I have share some usefull tips to free up android space. So read them carefully.

(1) Save camera photos and videos to EXTERNAL SD card by default rather than internal storage:

you can set you camera to save straight to your SD card, so you wouldn’t have to always worry about your media suddenly overwhelming your device or bogging down your Android OS. It’s actually very easy to do this: go to your camera app/settings/storage and select memory card.

(2)Uninstall Unused Applications:

If you have some apps that you no longer use on your Android phone or tablet, uninstalling them will free up some space and increase your phone performance. To do so, go to Settings -> Applications manager and uninstall the apps you don’t want.
Clear App Cache
You can also clear app’s cache on your phone. Clearing the cache removes an application’s temporary files and thus can free up some space. In order to do that, go to Settings > Applications manager, find apps that take up the most space, and then tap on ‘Clear cache’.
Alternatively, you can download a cache cleaner app like Clean Master to help you clear those junk files quickly.

(3)Upload your Photos to Online Storage:

Photos often take up a lot of space on a smartphone. Rather than storing them all on your phone, you could use a cloud storage service like Google+ Photos that automatically backup all your photos in the cloud. To enable cloud sync, go to Menu > Photos > Auto-Backup. All uploaded photos can be safely viewed on your desktop and other Android devices connected to your Google account.

(4)Delete Unnecessary Files and Folders

Most of the people leave the downloaded files on their gadgets after use. These files consumes lot of space and your device becomes unavailable for your next downloads. Deleting unnecessary data regularly keeps your device space free. In this case, try an app called DiskUsage that helps you to find the files and directories on storage card which consume a lot of space. It displays all the information graphically, making it easy to see which files or content are eating up the most space. Just be careful to when you decide to delete something you see in DiskUsage that is what you think it is.

(5)Add an SD Card and Move Data There

Many Android devices still ship with microSD card slots, although they are becoming less and less common on newer devices. If your phone or tablet does have a microSD card slot, you can purchase a microSD card and insert it into your device to gain more storage. The storage you gain can’t usually be used for apps and other system files, but you can store music, videos, pictures, and other media files there. Some apps may allow you to move their cache locations to the SD card, too.

Even if your device already has an SD card, this is a good option if you want more storage. MicroSD cards are fairly cheap, so you can upgrade and get a lot more storage for a fairly low price. A quick look at Amazon shows 32 GB cards for $13 and 64 GB cards for $23.

After installing the SD card, connect your device to your computer and move your music, media, and other files there — or use a file manager app on your Android device for this.

(6)Move Apps to the SD Card

Some Android phones allow you to move apps to the SD card to free up space. Google has moved away from this feature for performance, stability, and security reasons in modern versions of Android, and it’s not always possible to do this — especially on modern phones.

It seems that this feature was removed in Android 4.4 KitKat. However, Samsung devices may still have this feature, even if they’re using KitKat or newer versions of Android. Just check your device to see if you have the option — you never know.

If it’s possible to move apps to the SD card on your device, you can open the Settings screen and tap Apps, App Manager, or whatever it’s called on your device. On an app’s details page — the same screen where you’ll see the Uninstall button — you may see a “Move to SD card” button under the Storage section. If you don’t, your device doesn’t support this or you haven’t installed an SD card. To move the app back to the built-in storage, tap “Move to device storage.”

Built-in apps can’t be moved in this way. Other apps may or may not be capable of being moved to the SD card — apps that need to run in the background generally won’t allow you to move them to the SD card. If a particularly app doesn’t support this but your device does, you’ll see the button appear but be grayed out. If you have an older device with this feature, you may be able to automatically install future apps to the SD card.

(7)Upload Photos Dropbox, Microsoft OneDrive, Flickr, or something else

Photos often take up a lot of space on a modern smartphone. Rather than storing them all on your phone, you could use an app that automatically uploads photos you take to an online account like Google+ Photos, Dropbox, Microsoft OneDrive, Flickr, or something else. Google+ Photos is integrated into the “Photos” app on your Android device and offers unlimited storage of photos. You can access them from within the Photos app or at photos.google.com on any computer.

However you do this, you can then use the Photos app on your device to remove the copies of photos stored on your device itself, potentially freeing up gigabytes of space. You could also just copy those photos to your computer and back them up the old-fashioned way, too.

The same trick could work with other files taking up a lot of space on your device — for example, you could upload a large music collection to a service like Google Play Music and stream it back to your device over an Internet connection, caching the files you need.

(8) Uninstall bundled apps that came with your device that you do not use (ROOT)

Requires: root.
Potential impact (high/med/low): low (but somehow feels really good).

Doors open when/if you root your device; suddenly, many (though not all) of the apps that came pre-installed when you bought your device, that you NEVER ever use. I would advise to back these apps up first, though (Clean Master can do it). This is because in case you want them back you may not be able to go to Google Play and simply reinstall them.

(9) Clean your ‘junk’ and cache files

This is something which you need to do periodically. These files include CACHE files for most apps, APKs (i.e. Android app installers) that may still be lingering around on your device, temp files and folders, etc.

Clean Master does a good job with this. You can do the ‘standard’ cleanup pretty much at will, but be careful what you are deleting if you switch to the ‘advanced’ tab. The advanced tab has a nice function whereby it will find and list the biggest files on your device, which can be very useful and impactful, just in case you forgot all about that 700 MB video file that you were watching on the bus six months ago.

(10)Delete Unnecessary Files and Folders

Most of the people leave the downloaded files on their gadgets after use. These files consumes lot of space and your device becomes unavailable for your next downloads. Deleting unnecessary data regularly keeps your device space free. In this case, try an app called DiskUsage that helps you to find the files and directories on storage card which consume a lot of space. It displays all the information graphically, making it easy to see which files or content are eating up the most space. Just be careful to when you decide to delete something you see in DiskUsage that is what you think it is.

USB OTG storage

You might not realise it, but many Android phones and tablets support USB OTG (On The Go), which allows you to plug in peripherals such as storage drives, just as you would with a PC.
Whether or not a device supports OTG won’t always be listed in its spec. A quick and easy way to check whether your device supports OTG is to download to it the USB OTG Checker app, free from Google Play.
Once you’ve established that your device supports OTG you simply need an OTG adaptor such as the Inateck HB3001G. It costs just £12.99 from Amazon, and has an assortment of USB slots and card readers for letting you attach peripherals to your phone or tablet. If you’re going to use it simply to insert a microSD card to a phone that doesn’t support removable memory then the phone should be able to power the device by itself. However, if you want to add an external hard drive you’ll probably need to also power the OTG adaptor (a USB power cable is provided).

so friends use these tricks and make free space in your android device.

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